Welcome to my blog here i will share with you my thoughts,feelings,information about ME/CFS and also Fibromyalgia hopefully will be of some help to you eventually can use this as a forum once it is established.Basically you will encounter the problems ive hit by having this illness,the hurdles i have overcome ,and my life adapted to living with this illness.I will post information about the illness helpful links and any questions you may feel will be useful.Thanks for taking time out to pop by please leave a message.

Friday, 14 May 2010

ME Awareness WEEK....Why im a wee late

I was unable to post on the 12th as i had drs opd and then little beknown to me i was rushed to hospital to see consultant at the eye treatment center.I have been suffering from eye pain for about 7 days didnt do anything about it,if everyday i went to see gp due to pain id be there daily!!Anyway explained my symptoms and explained it had got worse felt like pain and pressure.Well un be known to me when she examined the eye then did the normal optical reading chart.Left eye zoomed through like dream.Rt eye to which im having the pain well OMG covered good eye up i was gobsmacked i could only read frist 3 letters they being the large the rest being a blurr!!!So off i ended up at hospital after several tests and eye drops .as my girls said coming home with eyes like a Vampire ...lol such away with words my girls bless em.Im now on 2 lots eye drops 4 times aday,they dont know what it is thats caused this but know it's not infection still blurr in rt eye i was just amazed i hadnt noticed obviously my left eye is doing all the work.Anyway i have to return mon/tuesday for more tests one being feild test.Hopefully find out what it is ,is it related to my ME who knows.Anyway i have done a wee bit bloggin not much as shouldnt reaslly be on here but copied this from a blog i follow thought maybe interesting for my readers with and without suffering from ME.I will update about my eye,but for now thats all for cuple days.
hugs judexx
Happy ME/CFS awareness day!!!!
I have copy & pasted this post from Laurel's blog because I think it is well presented & perfect for people to learn more. Today is International ME/CFS Awareness Day. Unless you have or know someone with ME/CFS, you probably wouldn't know that. And even if you did know, you probably won't read about it in any newspaper, nor hear about it on any media outlet. Like many ME/CFS patients themselves, this day tends to go by unmentioned, unnoticed, unheard.So, in an effort to do my small part in raising awareness about this illness, here are just a few basic facts about ME/CFS:1. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a serious disease with a ridiculous name. CFS is also known as Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) and Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E). It is often abbreviated ME/CFS.2. ME/CFS is a complex, multi-systemic illness, effecting the immune, endocrine, cardiovascular, autonomic, and central nervous systems. It is classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a neurological disease.3. In order to be diagnosed with ME/CFS, you must present with: extreme, incapacitating exhaustion that is not alleviated by rest and reduces your activity level by at least 50%, as well as at least four of the following symptoms: post exertional malaise (a worsening of symptoms after even minor exertion) lasting more than 24 hours, muscle and joint pain, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, low grade fevers, headaches, unrefreshing sleep, and memory loss or difficulty concentrating. These symptoms must be present for at least 6 months or longer. ME/CFS patients often also suffer from neurological problems, sensory overload, orthostatic intolerance, exercise intolerance, flu-like symptoms, shortness of breath, chest pain, and other symptoms.4. According to the CDC, ME/CFS can be as or more debilitating than multiple sclerosis, lupus, COPD, HIV/AIDs, and end stage renal failure.Dr. Nancy Klimas, an immunologist who splits her time between ME/CFS and HIV/AIDS patients, was recently quoted in The New York Times as saying:
"I can tell you, if I had to choose between the two illnesses (in 2009) I would rather have H.I.V."5. ME/CFS afflicts both genders of all classes and all ages, including young children. Approximately 1 to 4 million Americans have ME/CFS. That's more than breast cancer, AIDS, or lung cancer combined.6. It has been estimated that about 25% of ME/CFS patients are fully disabled, and many of those are homebound or completely bedridden.7. ME/CFS often has a viral and sudden onset. Many viruses have been linked to CFS, including EBV (mononucleosis), CMV and HHV-6. Bacterial infections have also been associated with ME/CFS, including mycoplasma and Lyme Disease.8. In October of 2009, Science Magazine published a study showing a link between a newly discovered human retrovirus (XMRV) and ME/CFS. This study was conducted by the Whittemore Peterson Institute in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute and the Cleveland Clinic.9. There are over 4,000 published studies showing a clear, biophysical pathogenesis in ME/CFS. Some abnormalities found in ME/CFS include: low natural killer cell count and activity, activated T cells, increased levels of cytokines, abnormalities in brain metabolism, mitochondrial damage, orthostatic intolerance, low blood volume, problems with oxidative phosphorylation, blocks in methylation cycles, changes in genetic expressions, glutathione depletion, oxygen toxicity/cellular hypoxia, diastolic cardiomyopathies, left ventricular dysfunction in the heart, and delayed VO2 max (maximal oxygen utilization) following exercise or exertion.10. ME/CFS is thought to cost the U.S. economy about $25 billion a year, and perhaps more. The average cost per family of a ME/CFS patient is approximately $25,000 per year (including unemployment).11. Despite its prevalence and seriousness, ME/CFS is still one of the least funded of all illnesses in the United States (in the bottom 12). More money is spent each year studying hay fever than ME/CFS.12. Currently, there are no FDA approved treatments for ME/CFS, and there is no known cure.Sources:Phoenix Rising: About ME/CFSWhittemore Peterson Institute The CFIDS Association of AmericaSome things you can do to help:1. Help spread the word that ME/CFS is a serious and multi-systemic disease. If someone has false misconceptions about the illness, speak up and correct them.2. Don't call CFS "chronic fatigue." CFS is a complex illness effecting many different organ systems; it is not a single symptom. Referring to it merely as "chronic fatigue" (rather than CFS or ME/CFS) is not only incorrect, it can actually feel disrespectful.3. If you know someone with CFS, let them know you care. Drop them a line from time to time (without expecting a response). Listen to what they have to say, and ask if there's anything you can do to help.4. Become educated and involved. Read up on ME/CFS from legitimate sources and stay informed. Join advocacy groups such as the ones linked on this page, sign petitions, watch online webinars, and/or write to Congress to request more funding and awareness.5. Take a moment to ask the Secretary of Health to implement the recommendations of the CFS Advisory Committee. The CFIDS Association makes this easy for you. The letter is already written, so that all you have to do is add your name and address. There is room for further comment should you choose to add any additional thoughts.6. Wear a blue ribbon to show your support. If you are on Facebook, consider putting a twibbon on your profile picture to help raise awareness.7. As noted above, ME/CFS is one of the least funded of all illnesses. If you can afford to, make a donation to one of the many ME/CFS charities, such as the Whittemore Peterson Institute, The CFIDS Association of America, or PANDORA. If you are unable to donate, you can instead write to your local senators and representatives and ask that they allocate more funds toward ME/CFS research.

1 comment:

  1. Ji Jude
    Just happened to notice your post on Google alerts.
    You do realise eye problems as you described can be connected with Lyme Disease, many of us first diagnosed with ME/CFS find we actually have Lyme Disease.
    I have been having problems with my left eye recently flashing and blurring, I suspect and optician also agreed that it could be a nerve. I also have strange nerve tingling and twitching on my face.
    Those are just the minor problems most of my arthritis and muscle weakness has respolved now since being on long term antibiotics.

    How can the hospital be so sure you could not have an infection?